Pittock Mansion seeks Full-Time Development Director

Title: Development Director
Reports to: Executive Director
Direct Reports: 0.6 FTE (new position to be hired by the DD)
Salary: $63,000-$68,000. Pittock Mansion offers an excellent benefits package including Health, Dental, PTO, EAP, and retirement plan.
Type: Full-time/exempt
Mission Statement: To inspire understanding and stewardship of Portland history through Pittock Mansion, its collections, and programs.

In 1964, Pittock Mansion, one of Oregon’s most important historic homes, was going to be torn down and replaced by a subdivision. When Portlanders got wind of the plan they launched a grassroots campaign to save Pittock Mansion, and they succeeded. Repairs took 15 months and on June 4, 1965, a restored Pittock Mansion opened to the public. Having recently completed a public survey that informed improvements to the experience of visiting, we have become one of Portland’s premiere sights for residents and tourists alike. In recent years, we’ve gone from welcoming 72,000 visitors to over 110,000 visitors.

With 90% of revenue coming from admissions and the museum store, we are ready to take the leap from a membership program with hundreds of donors to a multi-faceted development program. If you are a builder with experience designing and executing successful annual fund campaigns, major donor programs, membership programs, grant strategies, and corporate sponsorship programs, we are eager to meet you. Bonus points if you have experience with planned giving and optimizing donor software. This is an exciting time of growth and evolution for Pittock Mansion, and a unique opportunity to start and grow a development department at a well-resourced organization.

Responsibilities

  • Model a culture of collaboration, abundance, and gratitude with internal and external partners and supporters
  • Create, implement, and institutionalize a major donor program, corporate sponsorship program, planned giving program, and foundation grant strategy to strengthen and diversify organizational funding
  • Refine and grow membership and annual giving programs
  • Manage Corporate Membership program including occasional after-hours events
  • Evaluate program effectiveness and revise and adapt for continual improvements
  • Coach, encourage, and support Development Committee, Board of Directors, key staff, and volunteers in fundraising activities
  • Engage board and staff by orchestrating cultivation, stewardship, and requests for support from corporate, foundation, and individual donors
  • Supervise a .6 FTE Development Associate
  • Collaborate with marketing on the design and production of fundraising materials and communications
  • Liaise with the Development Committee and Board of Directors reporting on development activities and progress
  • Create innovative fundraising campaigns
  • Create and manage the Development Department revenue and expense budget
  • Maximize efficiency of fundraising and constituent relationship management software

Qualifications

  • A passion for history, culture, and preservation
  • Five years of high-level nonprofit development experience
  • BA, CFRE, or commensurate experience
  • Exceptional organizational, and managerial skills in an evolving environment
  • Demonstrated success managing and motivating staff and volunteers, fostering a positive work environment, and modeling best practices
  • A record of asking for and securing stretch gifts
  • A persuasive story teller, both written and oral
  • Ability to understand interdepartmental connectedness and foster a collaborative work environment
  • Consistent ability to take ideas from vision to implementation
  • CRM and fundraising software expertise
  • Able to work weekends, holidays, and special events as necessary

Qualified candidate must complete background check prior to offer of employment.

Please submit your resume, cover letter, and three references (including a reference from someone you have supervised if available) to jobs@pittockmansion.org with Development Director in the subject line. Thank you for taking the time to explore possibilities with us!

Pittock Mansion seeks Part-Time Visitor Services Representative

POSITION: Part-Time Visitor Services Representative
REPORTS TO: Associate Director
COMPENSATION: $13.80 per hour

Pittock Mansion is a house of historical significance and visual magnificence, offering a uniquely personal opportunity to peek into the past. Attracting over 100,000 visitors in the past year, Pittock Mansion is one of the top destinations in Oregon, and the perfect place to experience the story of Portland. We are seeking a Part-Time Visitor Services Representative to join our dynamic frontline team. If you enjoy working with the public and want to gain professional experience at a premier historic house museum, then we are interested in meeting you.

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

  • Providing professional-level customer service to visitors, members, volunteers, and staff
  • Dedication to creating a positive and educational experience for visitors in line with the Mansion’s mission
  • Accurate processing of admissions, memberships, and store sales
  • Process reservations for tours and evening events in addition to daily tracking of tour schedule
  • Perform all opening and closing duties as assigned, including securing all buildings and deactivating and activating alarms
  • Light cleaning and maintenance of both museum and public areas
  • Enforce Mansion policies and respond to visitors’ needs (e.g., operate the elevator)
  • Carry out other duties as assigned

SKILLS REQUIRED:

  • High level of customer service and ability to interact with public, staff, and volunteers as a team member
  • Professional manner and appearance
  • Strong communication skills and attention to detail
  • Cash handling experience, preferably in a fast-paced environment
  • Ability to work weekends and occasional evenings
  • Dependable transportation
  • Ability to lift 30 lbs
  • Familiarity and understanding of Point of Sale systems and Microsoft Office programs especially Outlook and Excel

Qualified candidate must complete background check prior to offer of employment.

Please submit cover letter and résumé to jobs@pittockmansion.org. No phone calls, please.

Free Shuttle from W Burnside & NW Barnes Bus Stop

July 21 – Labor Day, take the FREE shuttle from the Trimet #20 bus* stop at W Burnside and NW Barnes (stop ID #687) to Pittock Mansion!

Shuttle pick-up and drop off is located at the gravel turnout at W Burnside and NW Barnes.

Shuttle runs every 30 minutes from 10am -5pm and is provided by a 12-passenger van marked with a sign identifying it as the shuttle to Pittock Mansion.

*Note: Some #20 buses end service before Pittock Mansion’s stop. Be sure the bus’s electronic sign says “to Beaverton TC” or ask the driver.

Please note shuttle vans are not wheelchair accessible. (TriMet offers some door-to-door neighborhood shuttle service through their Ride Connection program. Find out more at http://trimet.org/access/index.htm) Shuttle vans may have extra cargo space for strollers, but do not have children’s seats for transportation.

Shuttle is provided thanks to a partnership with America’s HUB World Tours.

hub logo

A Tale of Two Bridges: The History of Portland’s Steel Bridges

Portland’s first Steel Bridge circa 1890.
Photo courtesy of City of Portland Archives.

Did you know the Steel Bridge we know today is actually a replacement of the original?

Built in 1888, the original Steel Bridge was Portland’s second bridge crossing the Willamette River–the first being the Morrison Bridge, constructed in 1887. It was a double-decked swing span bridge, which let boats pass by pivoting the center span. The bridge was made with steel instead of wrought iron or wood, which was unusual at the time and inspired its name. The bottom deck was Portland’s first railroad crossing of the Willamette. Prior to the bridge, passengers had to exit their train, cross the river on a ferry, and reboard another train. The top deck accommodated streetcars, pedestrians, wagons, and later, automobiles.

Steel Bridge swung open to let a boat pass circa 1908.
Photo courtesy of City of Portland Archives.

The Steel Bridge was a vital crossing for the growing city of Portland, but heavy boat traffic required the bridge to open on a near-constant basis. The bridge’s clearance was so low that even small boats needed the bridge to open! The swing mechanism operated slowly, further disrupting traffic. Soon other problems came to light. The bridge could not accommodate either Portland’s growing traffic or heavier modern trains. This triggered construction of a new, improved bridge.

1913 photo of Portland’s new Steel Bridge.
Photo courtesy of City of Portland Archives.

In July 1912, just 24 years after the first Steel Bridge was completed, the current Steel Bridge opened. It is a double-deck, vertical lift span bridge, which lets boats pass by raising the center section. Higher clearance and a bottom railroad deck that can be raised independently of the top deck means small boats can pass without interfering with traffic. The vertical lift mechanism also operates faster than the previous swing span style. The new bridge kept the “Steel Bridge” name, and the old Steel Bridge was dismantled.

Henry Pittock (at center) celebrates with the crowd at the opening of the new Steel Bridge in July 1912.

Today, over 100 years later, the Steel Bridge is still a vital connector of Portland’s east and west sides, providing passage to thousands of cars, buses, MAX light rail, Amtrak trains, freight trains, pedestrians , and cyclists each day!

Water Testing Results at Pittock Mansion

Dear Pittock Mansion friends,

Your safety is our top priority. Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) is continuing testing for lead in drinking water at its facilities citywide.

Pittock Mansion recently had drinking water tested for lead and we wanted to confirm that no test results show elevated lead levels. 

On April 24, 2017, water samples from Pittock Mansion sinks and drinking fountains were collected. The samples were analyzed at the Portland Water Bureau Laboratory. PP&R received results on May 4; results are posted here. All water tested below the 20 parts per billion (ppb) threshold.

Consistent with guidance from the Portland Water Bureau and the Environmental Protection Agency, samples were taken from fixtures commonly used for drinking or cooking.

If you have any questions about the water test results, please contact Mark.Ross@portlandoregon.gov or call Mark at 503-823-5300.

To stay informed about water testing for lead at all PP&R and City of Portland facilities, please see this website: www.portlandoregon.gov/LeadInfo.

To learn more about the risk of lead exposure and simple steps you can take to reduce your family’s exposure to lead, visit www.leadline.org or 503-988-4000.

Thank you,

 

 

 

Marta Bones
Executive Director, Pittock Mansion
A Portland Parks & Recreation partner

This Month In Local History: The Vista House

Vista House dedication ceremony, May 5, 1918.

Did you know Henry Pittock played a large role in the construction of the Vista House?

The Vista House is located at Crown Point along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The Columbia River Highway, constructed 1913-1922, connected Troutdale to The Dalles and the scenic hiking trails and waterfalls along the Columbia River. An engineering marvel at its time, the highway made passage of this difficult terrain safer.

The Vista House was proposed as a viewpoint rest stop for Columbia River Highway travelers and a monument to Oregon pioneers. The Vista House Association, made up of local businessmen, was formed to raise money for its construction. Henry Pittock, an Oregon pioneer himself, was named president.

The Vista House was completed and opened with a dedication ceremony on May 5, 1918 despite missed fundraising goals and multiple increases in construction costs. Henry Pittock was among the dignitaries at the ceremony.

Today the Vista House, like Pittock Mansion, is a favorite destination for tourists and locals alike!

 

History in Bloom

Early rhododendron blossoms frame Pittock Mansion.

Roses will bloom in the coming weeks!

Pittock Mansion’s grounds are stunning year round thanks to Portland Parks & Recreation and volunteer OSU Master Gardeners’ hard work, but spring is an especially beautiful time of year with the rhododendrons and roses in bloom.

Pittock Mansion’s original landscape plan included 350 rhododendrons and 276 roses, and many rhododendrons and roses can be found on the grounds today.

Rhododendrons, in a variety of whites, pinks, and purples, begin to blossom in April and continue through June. The 100 different species of roses on the grounds, including the Gold Struck “Georgiana Pittock” Rose, bloom May through August.

Visit our Facebook page to see some of the early blooms, or stop by soon and smell the roses yourself!

 

Preserving Pittock’s “Other” Building

View of the Gate Lodge with Pittock Mansion in background circa 1917.

The Pittocks built the Gate Lodge in conjunction with the mansion to house estate staff. While the splendor of the mansion often overshadows the Gate Lodge, the architectural significance of a four-story building engineered and built into a steep hillside should not be overlooked.

While the mansion required substantial restoration when the estate was purchased by the City of Portland in 1964, the Gate Lodge was in even greater disrepair with mold, rot, and cracked and peeling plaster throughout the 1914 home. Workers completed the initial restoration of the Gate Lodge in 1977, and the following decades saw the installation and later removal of catering equipment to accommodate a tea house, roof replacement, and extensive repairs after pipes froze and burst.

Pittock Mansion’s Gate Lodge. Erosion of the hillside has destroyed what was once a tiered garden with stairs leading to the exterior kitchen door on the second floor.

Sandbags help protect the Gate Lodge from water infiltration until drainage systems can be improved.

Today the greatest threats to the Gate Lodge are water intrusion and erosion of the hillside into which it is built. The Pittock Mansion Society is working with Portland Parks & Recreation to engineer a drainage plan that will protect the Gate Lodge and take into account the eroding effects of storm water on the southern slopes of the Mansion’s grounds.

The Pittock estate’s rescue and restoration is an inspiring story of what can be accomplished when dedicated citizens value preserving historic buildings and the stories of the people who lived in them.

 

How Portlanders Saved Pittock Mansion from Developers

PARC members collect donations for Pittock Mansion in exchange for free haircuts. Published in the Portland Journal, 1964.

Rose Festival princess Gail Weyand waves a booster sign to show her support for Pittock Mansion at the antique car parade fundraiser. Published in the Portland Reporter March 25, 1964.

In 1964, demolition threatened Pittock Mansion. The mansion, empty and damaged from the 1962 Columbus Day Storm, caught the interest of developers planning to turn the site into a subdivision. After public outcry, The City of Portland agreed to buy the property and turn it into a park if citizens could prove widespread public support by raising $100,000 of the $225,000 price tag in 30 days.

Volunteers formed the Pittock Acres Retention Committee (PARC) to head fundraising efforts. Organized into women’s and men’s divisions, the women of PARC solicited neighborhood groups and the men solicited local businesses for support.

PARC organized many publicity events and fundraisers, including a parade of historic automobiles, a car wash, an afternoon tea at Pittock Mansion that served 5,000 visitors tea in paper cups, and a last-minute “Eleventh Hour Dance” at the Multnomah Hotel.

Contributions ranged from a few cents to $1,000. Despite PARC’s efforts, they raised just $67,510 of the $100,000 goal by deadline. Still determined to save Pittock Mansion, PARC convinced the city council of the merits of adding Pittock Acres to complete a chain of park land in the West Hills from Forest Park to Washington Park. On April 22, 1964, the city council voted to complete the purchase.

After 13 months of restoration, Pittock Mansion opened to the public. Thank you to the Portland community for their support in 1964 and today!

See more photo of the fundraising efforts in 1964 on our Facebook page.

Explore early Oregon through Kate Pittock’s eyes

Kate Pittock Hebard, Henry and Georgiana’s daughter who lived in Pittock Mansion, took a series of snapshots of Oregon life for her cousin back East, Jennie Priscilla Pittock.

Below are just a few of Kate’s photos, head to our Facebook page to see them all!

Hotel Portland

Chinese Actor

Wreck of The Regulator at the Cascades

 

See more of Kate’s early Oregon photos on Facebook

Hours

June – Sept. 4 10am – 5pm Daily
Sept. 5 – Dec. 31 10am – 4pm Daily
Nov. 17 – 19 CLOSED
Thanksgiving Day CLOSED
Christmas Day CLOSED
January CLOSED
Feb. – May 10am – 4pm Daily

 

Admission

Members FREE
Adults $10.00
Seniors (65+) $9.00
Youth (ages 6–18) $7.00
Children under 6 FREE

Want to learn more about Pittock Mansion?